Robert Charles Venturi and Denise Scott Brown
This husband-and-wife team have revolutionised late-20th century architecture, promoting and celebrating complexity in design, in stark contrast to the earlier trend towards functional modernism, particularly in corporate buildings. Working mostly within the U.S., they have also been involved in some notable international projects, including the Sainsbury Wing of London’s National Gallery.
(image courtesy of worldarchitecture.org)

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124-mackintoshroomdeluxe1903

Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Margaret Macdonald
This design match was made at Glasgow’s School of Art in 1892, where both Mackintosh and Macdonald enrolled as students. This Art Nouveau duo worked in close partnership, although the long-standing patriarchal bias within the design establishment meant that Margaret’s contribution was often overlooked in favour of her husband’s more famous works.
(image courtesy of willowtearooms.co.uk)

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125-03

Eero & Aline Saarinen
Back then it was a man’s world, but as the lyrics go, it would be nothing without a woman or a girl. Aline worked at the New York Times as an art editor and critic, and met Eero Saarinen when writing a piece on the on his architectural work. Eero had recently gotten divorced and the pair fell in love. They got married shortly after and Aline supported her husband by promoting his work to the press as the Head of Information Service at Eero Saarinen & Associates.
(image courtesy of notesontheroad.com)

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126-04

Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm MacLaren
With a passion that burned bright and a shared design vision that revolutionised punk-era Britain, this outré pairing spearheaded late ‘70s and early ‘80s New Wave music and fashion. Never far from controversy, their most famous clients, The Sex Pistols, showcased Westwood and MacLaren’s shock-value clothes to perfection.
(image courtesy of theredlist.com)

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127-02

Ray and Charles Eames
Shortly after Charles Eames divorced his first wife in 1940, he met Ray and they married a little over a year later. The rest is history, with their influential designs of legendary contemporary furniture such as the Eames Lounge and Ottoman. They focused heavily on design and often spent most their days in the studio from early morning to late night. Charles passed away in 1978, but his wife Ray continued to study their design ideas through writing as well as inspiring and educational talks.
(image courtesy of loc.gov)

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